12 Reasons Why Your Hair Is Falling Out

Why Your Hair Is Falling Out

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Alopecia or what’s known as hair loss is a problem that can be faced by both men and women. It may seem like a trivial matter, but for those experiencing it, hair loss can be a very distressing problem. In some cases, it can even lead to depression.

recent studies have shown that hair loss affects around 40% of women and 50% of men at some point in their lives. So, if you’re starting to see more hair in your brush than usual, or if you’re noticing patches of baldness on your head, don’t panic! We’ve put together a list of 12 possible reasons why your hair is falling out, as well as what you can do about it.

Hair loss can be caused by a number of different factors, here are 12 reasons we think keeps your hair falling out.

1. Hormonal changes

Hair loss is often linked to hormonal changes in the body, such as those that occur during pregnancy, menopause or with the use of birth control pills. During pregnancy, many women notice their hair becoming thicker and shinier. However, after the baby is born, they may start to experience hair loss. This is because, during pregnancy, high levels of certain hormones (estrogen) cause the body to hold onto hair that would otherwise be shed. When these hormone levels return to normal after delivery, the extra hair is shed. This usually occurs within 6 to 12 months after giving birth.

Menopause can also cause hormonal changes that lead to hair loss. As women age, their bodies produce less estrogen. This can cause the hair follicles to miniaturize, making them smaller and less productive. As a result, the hair may become thinner, weaker, and start to fall out.

Birth control pills can also cause hormonal changes that may lead to hair loss. These pills contain the hormone progesterone, which can cause the hair follicles to miniaturize, leading to thinner, weaker hair. If you’re taking birth control pills and notice your hair thinning, talk to your doctor about switching to a different type of pill.

2. Nutritional deficiencies

Hair loss can also be caused by nutritional deficiencies, such as a lack of protein, iron, or zinc in the diet. Protein is essential for healthy hair growth, so if you’re not getting enough protein from your diet, your hair may start to thin. The best way to get enough protein is to eat a balanced diet that includes lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy. If you’re vegetarian or vegan, you can get protein from beans, nuts, and tofu.

Iron is also essential for healthy hair growth. Iron helps carry oxygen to the hair follicles, which is necessary for the growth of new hair. If you’re not getting enough iron in your diet, your hair may start to thin. The best way to get enough iron is to eat plenty of leafy green vegetables, as well as lean meats, poultry, fish, and beans. You can also take an iron supplement if you feel you’re not getting enough from your diet.

Zinc is another nutrient that’s essential for healthy hair growth. Zinc helps the body produce new hair cells and keeps the scalp healthy. If you’re not getting enough zinc in your diet, your hair may start to thin. The best way to get enough zinc is to eat plenty of lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, and nuts. You can also take a zinc supplement if you feel you’re not getting enough from your diet.

3. Stress

Stress can be another factor that leads to hair loss. When you’re under stress, your body produces the hormone cortisol, which can cause the hair follicles to miniaturize, leading to thinner, weaker hair. If you’re experiencing a lot of stress, try to find ways to relax and reduce your stress levels. This may include yoga, meditation, or aromatherapy.

4. Medications

Certain medications can cause hair loss as a side effect. These include chemotherapy drugs used to treat cancer, blood thinners, beta-blockers used to treat heart conditions, and antidepressants. If you’re taking any medication that’s causing hair loss, talk to your doctor about switching to a different drug.

5. Autoimmune disorders

Autoimmune disorders occur when the body’s immune system attacks healthy tissues by mistake. This can lead to hair loss because the immune system mistakenly views the hair follicles as foreign invaders and attacks them. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder that can cause patchy hair loss on the scalp, face, and body. If you have an autoimmune disorder, talk to your doctor about treatment options.

6. Skin conditions

Certain skin conditions can also lead to hair loss. Eczema is a skin condition that can cause the hair follicles to become inflamed, leading to hair loss. Psoriasis is another skin condition that can cause the scalp to become scaly and dry, which can lead to hair loss. If you have a skin condition that’s causing hair loss, talk to your doctor about treatment options.

7. Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania is a disorder that causes people to pull their hair out. This can lead to patchy hair loss on the scalp, face and body. If you have trichotillomania, talk to your doctor about treatment options.

8. Thyroid problems

Thyroid problems can also lead to hair loss. The thyroid is a gland that produces hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism. If the thyroid isn’t functioning properly, it can lead to a condition called hypothyroidism, which can cause hair loss. If you think you may have a thyroid problem, talk to your doctor about testing and treatment options.

9. Menopause

Menopause can also lead to hair loss. During menopause, the levels of the hormone estrogen in the body decline. This can cause the hair follicles to miniaturize, leading to thinner, weaker hair. If you’re experiencing menopausal hair loss, talk to your doctor about treatment options.

10. Nutrition

Nutrition can also play a role in hair loss. If you’re not eating a balanced diet, your hair may start to thin. Be sure to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as lean proteins. You should also drink plenty of water. If you think you may be deficient in certain nutrients, talk to your doctor about taking supplements.

11. Genetics

Genetics can also be a factor in hair loss. If you have a family member who has experienced hair loss, you may be more likely to experience it yourself. There are certain genetic conditions that can cause hair loss, such as alopecia areata and male pattern baldness. If you think genetics may be a factor in your hair loss, talk to your doctor about testing and treatment options.

12. Aging

Aging can also lead to hair loss. As we age, the hair follicles miniaturize, leading to thinner, weaker hair. If you’re experiencing age-related hair loss, talk to your doctor about treatment options. There are certain medications that can help prevent or slow down hair loss, such as minoxidil and finasteride.

If you’re experiencing hair loss, talk to your doctor about possible causes and treatment options. There are many different reasons why someone may lose their hair, but there are also many different treatment options available. With the help of a medical professional, you can find the cause of your hair loss and get started on a treatment plan.